IQAC in North-Eastern Hill University

Constitution of IQAC in NEHU
NAAC SSR 2015
Addendm SSR 2014-15 & 2015-16
Minutes of IQAC Meetings
Revised IQAC Guidelines 2013
IQAC Guidelines 2007-12
IQAC Conference 2017 CAS Application Form

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some Important & Related Hyperlinks

NEHU Official Website
Quality Parameters
Feedback from Stakeholders
Seminars and Workshops
Adoption of Good Practices
Institutional Database
Quality Radars
Quality Assurance Report

IQAC in Other Universities

Andhra University
Assam Central University
Devi Ahilya Vishwavidyalaya
M.S. University, Baroda
Mizoram University
Vellore Institute of Technology
Vidyasagar University

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quality Attainment and Assessment Radars


A radar chart is a graphical method of displaying multivariate data in the form of a two-dimensional chart of three or more quantitative variables represented on axes starting from the same point. The relative position and angle of the axes is typically uninformative. The radar chart is a chart and/or plot that consists of a sequence of equi-angular spokes, called radii, with each spoke representing one of the variables. The data length of a spoke is proportional to the magnitude of the variable for the data point relative to the maximum magnitude of the variable across all data points. A line is drawn connecting the data values for each spoke. This gives the plot a star-like appearance and the origin of the name of this plot. The star plot can be used to answer the following questions:

     * What variables are dominant for a given observation?
     * Which observations are most similar, i.e., are there clusters of observations?
     * Are there outliers?

Radar charts are a useful way to display multivariate observations with an arbitrary number of variables. Each observation is represented as a star-shaped figure with one ray for each variable. For a given observation, the length of each ray is made proportional to the size of that variable. Radar charts differ from glyph plots in that all variables are used to construct the plotted star figure. There is no separation into foreground and background variables. Instead, the star-shaped figures are usually arranged in a rectangular array on the page. It is somewhat easier to see patterns in the data if the observations are arranged in some non-arbitrary order, and if the variables are assigned to the rays of the star in some meaningful order. Each star represents a single observation. Typically, radar charts are generated in a multi-plot format with many stars on each page and each star representing one observation. Generally, radar charts are used to examine the relative values for a single data point (e.g., point 3 is large for variables 2 and 4, small for variables 1, 3, 5, and 6) and to locate similar points or dissimilar points.